Can Microsoft get LG excited about Windows Phone again?

LG has recently soured on Windows Phone as its broader mobile business continues to struggle. With Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer visiting Seoul soon, a meeting may be in the works.

The LG Viper, one of many non-Windows Phones that LG is churning out this year. Josh Miller/CNET

Microsoft is going to have to work quickly if it wants to avoid losing a Windows Phone supporter in LG.

Following another disappointing quarter of sales decline in its key mobile devices business, LG said the company hasn't seen much success with Microsoft's mobile platform and doesn't expect to make any Windows Phone products in the near future. According to the Korea Herald, LG will instead continue its Android efforts.

LG's comments after last week's earnings report come as a blow to Microsoft, which is still trying to make headway with its fledgling mobile platform. The company is still rallying developers to its cause while maintaining excitement among its vendor partners. Making matters worse has been the cozy relationship that Microsoft has struck with Nokia, considered first among Windows Phone partners.

But with Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer visiting Seoul in May, the Korea Herald suggests that a meeting could be in the works, citing industry sources. Ballmer, however, would have his work cut out for him in getting LG excited about Windows Phone again.

Microsoft told the Korea Herald that Ballmer's schedule hasn't been set, while LG said it wasn't aware of any meeting.

LG representative Ken Hong told CNET that the Korea Herald report took the comments on the conference call out of context, and said the company isn't giving up on Windows Phone. Hong, however, did note that there are no Windows Phones in the pipeline, and said the focus is on Android now because demand is so strong.

Hong said he hadn't heard of any potential meeting between LG and Ballmer.

Microsoft, meanwhile, declined to comment to CNET.

LG's frustrations with Windows Phone aren't surprising given the weakness in its overall results. As rival Samsung Electronics has soared with the popular Galaxy S franchise, LG saw both its handset business and overall mobile communications division each fall 14 percent over the previous year. The decline amid the company's attempt to revive its mobile handset efforts.

The company, however, has seen enough traction with Android to keep supporting the platform. In the U.S., the company recently launched the LG Viper with Sprint Nextel, one of the carrier's first 4G LTE smartphones -- even though its LTE network isn't quite up yet.

Updated at 11:05 a.m. and 11:34 a.m. PT: to include a response from LG and Microsoft.

 

ARTICLE DISCUSSION

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

Hot on CNET

The Next Big Thing

Consoles go wide and far beyond gaming with power and realism.