Bug.gd hooks up error messages with proven workarounds

Bug.gd hosts a hive of error messages with fixes, generated by Microsoft, the bug.gd team, and user contributions.

bug'gd logo

Anyone who has ever yanked their hair at a maddening error message will appreciate the concept behind bug.gd, a Web app devoted to linking up error messages and user-contributed workarounds.

While the site has given the general public a head start by linking to Microsoft articles explaining common Microsoft error messages, bug.gd's role in providing distraught users with the right solution is a partial illusion. The database will grow most through user contributions. Bug.gd's team assumes that most users will figure out a workaround within two days.

Partial view of a bug.gd error result.

If that's you, it means you enter the query and if no answer appears, bug.gd will shoot you an e-mail 48 hours later hoping you'll be able to answer your own question.

A word on aesthetics, since I care about these things. For reasons not yet thoroughly analyzed, I became slightly seasick from Bug.gd's white, gray, and black theme as I searched and scrolled. I'd also like to see more complete search filtering and tagging; right now your search term, if accepted, is likely to return lengthy, monotonous listings.

Bug.gd is currently free to use, which seems natural considering its only real value at present is to offer a forum for searching Microsoft error messages and building bug.gd's database. Going forward, the bug.gd crew anticipates adding command-line tools and selling a fully mature product (bug.gd is currently in beta) to corporations--it's unconfirmed whether or not there will be room for individual use. If not, heavy contributors might knock down their door demanding a cut.

Tags:
Software
About the author

Jessica Dolcourt reviews smartphones and cell phones, covers handset news, and pens the monthly column Smartphones Unlocked. A senior editor, she started at CNET in 2006 and spent four years reviewing mobile and desktop software before taking on devices.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The best 3D-printing projects of 2014 (pictures)
15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)
2015.5 Volvo XC60: updated tech, understated design
Busted! CNET readers show us their broken devices (pictures)