Box.net arrives on Android devices

Box.net has made its way to Android devices and brings with it a handful of features not found on its iOS siblings, like search and better performance.

Box Android

Online storage and collaboration service Box.net is finally available on Android devices.

The free app, which hit the Android market today, does just about everything Box does on the iPhone and iPad , with a few added tricks. It can, for instance, now let you search for your files by name, and if a user is a business customer, it will even search the content found within those files.

Box's CEO and co-founder Aaron Levie told CNET earlier this week the same search feature would be coming to the iOS flavor of Box's apps, but he said Android users were more likely to use and expect that there would be a search feature given that they were using a Google phone.

The app also lets users upload any file that's on their phone both from the Box app, and from places like Android's camera or photo gallery. Levie was quick to point out that Box on Android was not as limited as it was on the iPhone though. "On iOS we can only let you upload photos, but you can do anything on the Android," he said.

Box on Android
Box.net for Android does pretty much everything its iOS counterparts can do, but is a bit speedier, and can upload any file type. Box.net

One last trick up the sleeve of the Android version is that its speed doesn't get bogged down the larger your library of files gets. That could be a problem on the iPhone and make cruising through large folders of photos a laborious process. According to Levie, that issue will be addressed on iOS devices as well but that for now Android users would be getting better performance.

The new app works on any Android device running Android 2.0 or higher. Levie said that the next platform on the docket would be BlackBerry, which is due in the next few months.

About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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