Billionth Logitech mouse scampers off assembly line

To mark the occasion, peripheral maker has also launched a contest inviting people to track the milestone mouse.

Logitech contest
Logitech

Hunting down mice isn't my personal idea of fun, but this mouse mission might not be so eek-worthy. Logitech has launched a contest inviting people to track its billionth mouse shipped, a milestone announced Wednesday.

A PR stunt to be sure, but also a nice chance to reflect on Logitech's 20-plus highly successful years in the mouse-making business (check out this cool PDF of Logitech mice that never made it out of the lab--hockey puck design, anyone?).

But back to the billionth mouse. The milestone mouse's journey will be chronicled on Logitech's blog, Blogitech. Each day, the notable mouse (named Billie, naturally) will post online mouse-related questions. Get a question right and you can enter a daily drawing to win a Logitech product.

Founded in a Swiss farmhouse in 1981, Logitech introduced its first retail mouse in 1985 and reached the 100 millionth mouse mark in 1996. Today, it says it sells mice in more than 100 countries worldwide and manufactures an average of 376,000 mice per day and 7.8 million every month.

The company timed its billionth-mouse announcement to coincide with the upcoming 40th anniversary of the first public demonstration of the computer mouse (which, coincidentally, some might also peg as the 40th anniversary of RSI).

Of course, with input methods like touch screens and gesture recognition becoming more common, it'll be interesting to see how many more mice from Logitech (and others) roll off the assembly line in years to come. Is Billie becoming anachronistic?

About the author

Leslie Katz, Crave's senior editor, heads up a team that covers the most crushworthy (and wackiest) tech, science, and culture around. As a co-host of the now-retired CNET News Daily Podcast, she was sometimes known to channel Terry Gross and still uses her trained "podcast voice" to bully the speech recognition software on automated customer service lines. E-mail Leslie.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The best and worst quotes of 2014 (pictures)
A roomy range from LG (pictures)
This plain GE range has all of the essentials (pictures)
Sony's 'Interview' heard 'round the world (pictures)
Google Lunar XPrize: Testing Astrobotic's rover on the rocks (pictures)
CNET's 15 favorite How Tos of 2014