Big barbecue flavor from a small package

Compact PLEK 66 barbecue takes up a smaller footprint than standard grills

Appliancist

If you've been to enough backyard cookouts, then you've probably borne witness to the unspoken competition between barbecue hosts that has them gushing about "whose grill is biggest."

The conversation generally plays out as follows:

"Hey, Jim. I see you bought the Cookout King 2000. How many dogs can you fit on it?"

"Thanks, Steve. Four packs at a time."

"Not bad, Jim. I just bought the Grill-O-Matic 3500. I can squeeze on four packs plus a roll of hamburgers and a bag of buns."

"Wow, Steve. You're feeding a crowd that size?"

"Well... no... but why do I care about that?"

As this PLEK 66 Compact Barbecue Grill by Rocal proves, in the world of grilling, bigger isn't always necessarily better. The grill is designed to occupy a smaller footprint next to a wall, but don't let the smaller size trick you into thinking it lacks storage: under the grill, there is a drawer for charcoal and another for utensils, and you can use the included magnetic shelves if you need additional horizontal space. True, you won't be able to fit an economy-size package of burgers on its smaller surface, but it's the perfect size for a small collection of burgers, steaks, cedar plank salmon or vegetables.

Rocal specializes in fireplaces and grills that serve both as functional pieces and beautiful centerpieces. The grill pictured here is the PLEK 66, but you can find information about Rocal's other fire-related products on their Web site.

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