Better pwning with Killer Xeno network card

Bigfoot releases new network card that offers built-in voice acceleration technology for better online gaming.

Bigfoot

Not to brag, but I have a great gaming rig--a super fast CPU and GPU, and a big 30-inch LCD. I even have a customized mouse and keyboard. I often buy the collector's editions of games. I'm serious, and yet, more often that not, I get my behind handed to me in WoW PvP and any games that require me to kill my opponent.

Finally, I found out the reason: my computer doesn't have a Killer Xeno network card.

On Monday, Bigfoot Networks, a company that I recently heard of that makes special network cards for gamers, launched its upgraded voice-chat-enabled network interface card for online gamers, called Killer Xeno Ultra.

Basically, this is a gigabit network card that comes with many added functions designed especially for online game playing, including a feature called Killer Xeno voice-chat acceleration technology.

The technology addresses the feature most requested by gamers, a "hiccup-free" voice experience for online games. The Killer Xeno network card provides this.

Other than the voice-acceleration features, the Killer Xeno gaming network cards can help deliver the ultimate online gaming experience, decreasing latency and offering better frame rates. The Killer Xeno Ultra has twice the amount of RAM than the previous Killer Xeno Pro version. Other than that, both cards feature:

  • PCIe interface, which provides for higher throughput
  • Killer Xeno NPU--a dedicated smart packet processor for all network operations, which ensures the delivery of time-sensitive data like game control and VoIP
  • Plug-and-play compatibility with all games
  • Windows network stack bypass, which provides for direct-to-game interrupts
  • Integrated audio chip offloads VoIP operations to Killer Xeno NPU for "hiccup-free" voice communications while gaming
  • Onboard RAM (256 MB for the Ultra version and 128 for the Pro version) enables applications such as firewall, VoIP chat, and bandwidth control to run on the card simultaneously without system-performance degradation
  • Firewall: Stops intruders with zero gaming-performance impact. Based on robust Linux iptable implementation.
  • Bandwidth control, so you can prioritize network traffic for each application by setting bandwidth priorities and max/min limits through a simple interface
  • Onboard status display: Xeno Ultra model includes a customizable LED display for caller ID, network statistics, game information or any user-customized messages.

Bigfoot also revealed that it has partnered with VoIP solution providers TeamSpeak and Vivox, and with the popular open-source application Mumble to make the new card work better with their services.

Apart from its add-in card form factor, the Killer Xeno voice acceleration is also flexible enough to be used as OEM solution. According to Bigfoot, makers of hardware including Alienware (Dell's high-performance gaming brand), and EVGA will be the first exclusive PC OEM to ship the Killer Xeno Pro.

The Killer Xeno Pro will be available for $129.99 from both Alienware and EVGA in April, 2009. The Killer Xeno Ultra will be available for $179.99 in May at retailers.

OK, now you just wait until I get my new network card. Until then, I won't let you know my death knight's name or what WoW server I play in.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews 3D printers, networking/storage devices, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The best and worst quotes of 2014 (pictures)
A roomy range from LG (pictures)
This plain GE range has all of the essentials (pictures)
Sony's 'Interview' heard 'round the world (pictures)
Google Lunar XPrize: Testing Astrobotic's rover on the rocks (pictures)
CNET's 15 favorite How Tos of 2014