Best Nike Fuelband alternatives

The Fuelband is still here, but if you're looking for something else like it, here are your best bets.

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Sarah Tew/CNET

Despite news of Nike bailing on Fuelband hardware in the future, the Nike+ Fuelband isn't going anywhere right now. And it's still a very functional fitness tracker with some stylistic appeal, even if it's iOS-only.

But what if you use Android? What if you don't want a Fuelband, but you want something like it? What are your options?

Well, the seas are swimming with fitness bands. Here are some of the best choices we've reviewed, and a few we haven't yet but will.

Fitbit Flex

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Sarah Tew/CNET

This pick would have been the Fitbit Force a few months ago, if it weren't for that pesky recall. The Flex is a flawed pick: it's older and lacks a watch display. But it does show some sense of daily goal progress, and syncs easily with certain Android phones and iPhones. And it costs less than a Fuelband.
Read our review.

Misfit Shine

Misfit Shine
Sarah Tew/CNET

The Shine is small, waterproof, and it can work as a clock when you tap it (the LEDs form a clock face). It works with iOS and Android. It tracks sleep, has a great-looking app, and has enough accessories (pendant, clip, bands, watch-type leather straps, and even socks with pockets) to fit a lot of uses and styles. And it uses a watch-type battery that lasts for months.
Read our review.

Samsung Gear Fit

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Sarah Tew/CNET

The Fit, Samsung's latest wearable, has a lot of weird quirks: the necessary Samsung S Health software doesn't sync wonderfully, you have to use certain Samsung Galaxy phones with it, and it's expensive. But the Fit can also get notifications like a smart watch, is a good-looking watch, and can track heart rate, too.
Read our review.

Jawbone Up24

Jawbone Up24
Josh Miller/CNET

If you can live without having a readout on your wrist, the Jawbone Up does an excellent job tracking movement and sleep, as well as helping manage overall health. You can wear Up24 in the shower, and it syncs automatically with iOS and Android. But, the bracelet-like design isn't for everyone.
Read our review.

Basis B1 Band

Basis Science Basis B1 Band
Sarah Tew/CNET

The Basis is more of a watch than the Fuelband, and it's got a lot of extras, including heart-rate monitoring and some lifestyle-coaching tools. It works on iOS and Android, too.
Read our review.

Others:

Garmin Vivofit

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Sarah Tew/CNET

Garmin's band might be the truest competitor to the Fuelband: it has a readable watch, tracks steps, and even has a red bar that grows unless you get active fast. It syncs with iOS and Android, is water-resistant, works with external heart-rate monitors, and has a watch-type battery that lasts over a year. Stay tuned for a review.

Withings Pulse O2

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Withings

The last Withings Pulse pedometer and heart-rate monitor was one of my favorite fitness trackers of 2013; the 2014 update adds the ability to check blood oxygen levels, and new accessories include a cool watchband that turns the Pulse O2 into a true fitness band/watch. It's essentially a firmware update to the existing Pulse, along with a cool new accessory. That's good news for existing Pulse owners.
Read our review of the 2013 Withings Pulse.

Polar Loop

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Polar

The horizontal red LED display on the Loop mirrors that of the Fuelband, and tells time in big numbers the same way. Polar's band can also loop in heart-rate monitor data from compatible bands. One disadvantage: the Loop's band needs to be trimmed to fit. Stay tuned for a review soon.

 

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