Bank of America seeks to patent abandoning America

Bank of America is trying to patent the process of getting rid of expensive American workers in favor of outsourced development. Very American of it.

Bank of America believes Americans to be overloaded with "a high salary, good benefits, a good work environment, vacation time, and other job-related perks." For shame!

But have no fear, Bank of America has submitted a patent application that will help companies find places to get work done where such pesky things as nice salaries, good benefits, good work environments, and vacation time are abandoned. (And yet, as Bret and Jermaine of Flight of the Conchords suggest, getting cheaper labor doesn't necessarily lead to cheaper products, though it does lead to fatter profits.)

Here's what it looks like:

Bank of America

Sarcasm aside, Bank of America is simply attempting to add some computer analysis to the off-shoring/near-shoring/outsourcing decision, as it notes in its patent application:

The country assessment relates to the assessment of offshore, near shore, and outsourcing relocation options for a line of business. Each country may be evaluated based on a geographic model that may be generated. The geographic model may include one or more risk factors and one or more reward drivers that may help to assess a country's value as a relocation option. Portions of the country assessment may be performed in a computer system. Moreover, the geographic model may be generated in a computer system.

Nothing wrong with that. Indeed, Bank of America is probably right when it suggests that "A business entity is forced to commit significant resources to employ an American work force and may often find that the demands of American employees far exceed the allotted budget." It's simply trying to remove some of the risks associated with going abroad to get work done.

Even so, the irony of Bank of America seeking to leave behind American workers is a bit thick. :-)

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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