Backstage at the Red Sox's beloved ballpark

Road Trip 2010: For Red Sox Nation, there is nothing more sacred than Fenway Park in Boston. CNET reporter Daniel Terdiman pays a visit to see all the ballpark's most sacred spots.

A view of Fenway Park from a slat in the wall behind the manual scoreboard that is part of the famed Green Monster Daniel Terdiman/CNET

BOSTON--On April 12, 1912, after two days of rain, the Boston Red Sox and the New York Highlanders played the first game ever at Fenway Park.

Ninety-eight years later, the ballpark is called--by the Red Sox at least--the most adored in Major League Baseball. It's possible that Chicago Cubs fans might dispute that, given how protective they are of Wrigley Field.

Either way, there's no arguing that Fenway is much loved, and on Thursday, as part of Road Trip 2010, I got a chance to visit the park and see many of the areas that are generally used by the pros--the Red Sox dugout, the visiting clubhouse, the press box, the area behind the manual scoreboard inside the famed Green Monster, and more.

Since I'm not a natural Sox fan, it was possible for me to visit all those places without losing my cool. Still, I'm a lifelong baseball fan and there's no way I could miss the significance and specialness of many of them. Please click below to see my full photo gallery on the best spots at Fenway Park.

For the next two weeks, Geek Gestalt will be on Road Trip 2010. After driving more than 18,000 miles in the Rocky Mountains, the Pacific Northwest, the Southwest and the Southeast over the last four years, I'll be looking for the best in technology, science, military, nature, aviation and more throughout the American northeast. If you have a suggestion for someplace to visit, drop me a line. In the meantime, you can follow my progress on Twitter @GreeterDan and @RoadTrip and find the project on Facebook. And you can also test your knowledge of the U.S. and try to win a prize in the Road Trip Picture of the Day challenge.

 

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