Backblaze iPhone app gives access to online backups

The online backup startup will release an app in coming weeks to let iOS users see and share files, including versions up to 30 days old.

Backblaze's iOS app gives access to an account holder's backed-up PC files.
Backblaze's iOS app gives access to an account holder's backed-up PC files. Backblaze

Backblaze, an online backup start-up, announced plans to release an iPhone app in coming weeks to let customers tap into their files.

"Having restored 2.5 billion files for our customers, we found that 22 percent of recoveries contained a single file and realized customers were using Backblaze to access their files remotely," said Chief Executive Gleb Budman in a statement. Backblaze's Web interface already lets people retrieve files, but the iOS app will extend the ability to mobile devices.

Backblaze still is chiefly about backup rather than synchronizing files across multiple devices. For example, it keeps copies of files for 30 days, letting you step back to older versions or recover deleted ones. But the iPhone app does nudge BackBlaze a step closer to the world of DropBox, Google Drive, SkyDrive, and other services people use to remotely access files.

According to Backblaze, the app lets people do the following:

  • See all PC and Mac computers they currently back up.
  • Select files from these computers and their external hard drives.
  • View and download these photos, songs, movies, and other documents.
  • Access previous versions of these files.
  • Print, text, e-mail, post to Facebook and Twitter, or save files to the camera roll.

The app is scheduled for release within several weeks, the company said.

Backblaze currently has backed up 45,000,000GB of data, more conveniently expressed as 45 petabytes.

Corrected at 11:26 a.m. PT: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated the proper expression of 45 million gigabytes, which is 45 petabytes.

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)
2015.5 Volvo XC60: updated tech, understated design
Busted! CNET readers show us their broken devices (pictures)
Take a closer look at the BlackBerry Classic (pictures)