B&W fills out its headphones line with sleek P3

The $199.99 Bowers & Wilkins P3 headphones feature a remote/microphone attachment that works with iOS and Android smartphones thanks to a swappable cable.

The Bowers & Wilkins P3 headphones, which ship in June, come in white or black (click to enlarge). Bowers & Wilkins

Bowers & Wilkins' first two models of headphones -- the on-ear P5 and in-ear C5 -- have earned strong reviews from CNET. Now the company is extending its headphones line with a more affordable and more lightweight on-ear model, the P3, featuring a fold-up design and a hard-shell carrying case.

The company says its P3 headphones are made out of aluminum and durable rubber and have custom-made, ultralight acoustic fabric on the earpads (the pads use memory foam).

They certainly look pretty sweet and judging from my experience with the P5 and C5, I bet they sound pretty sweet. Those models delivered detailed, well-balanced sound ("natural," is another way to put it), and the company is also touting those qualities in this model.

The black version, folded. Bowers & Wilkins

Along with the carrying case, you get one cable with a remote/microphone attachment that works with the iPhone and another that is compatible with all other mobile phones and MP3 players. B&W says swapping cables is easy: it "simply involves popping off the replaceable earpads."

The P3's drive unit. The cable can be swapped out. Bowers & Wilkins

This cable option isn't something I've seen before and is obviously appealing to someone who rocks both iOS and Android devices. I know it's hard to believe from some of the comments we get here on CNET, but some people don't have a problem sharing their allegiance.

The Bowers & Wilkins P3 headphones come in black or white and will be available in June with a suggested retail price of $199.99. I should have a full review up shortly before they're released.

 

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