Automatic roti maker Rotimatic joins the bread-maker family

Roti is a classic unleavened bread will soon be given the automatic treatment. The Rotimatic is a countertop appliance that can produce one roti per minute.

The Rotimatic automatic roti maker will offer freshly baked roti on demand.
The Rotimatic automatic roti maker will offer freshly baked roti on demand. Rotimatic

A bread maker in the kitchen is more than just a time-saver, it is encouragement. If not for the bread machine, chances are loaves would come straight from the store shelves. Although the offerings from the store are rich and varied, nothing can compare to the delicious comfort of freshly baked bread. But why should Western-style loaves have all the fun?

The universe of bread is big, wide, and delicious. But one thing all bread holds in common, no matter what it is designed to hold, is that freshly baked is better. The Rotimatic, from the firm Zimplistic in Singapore, is a countertop appliance that churns out fresh flatbread. Designed to produce "one round and puffed roti a minute," the automatic roti maker offers deliciousness no matter what you call it.

Roti is unleavened bread and only requires oil, flour and water to make. Ingredients are added to the machine one at a time and are kept separated before making. Thickness, softness, and oil are user-defined settings, and when set in motion, the machine dispenses the correct ratio of ingredients, mixes them up and produces piping hot roti one at a time.

With the machine so simple to use, and with the reward being fresh bread, it should take little encouragement to see this up and running in kitchens everywhere -- it will however, take time; there is a waiting list.

Via Gizmodo/Andrew Liszewski

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