AutoCorrector app corrects iPhone auto-correct

No more stork clouds in the sky! Add your own words, names, and nicknames to your iOS auto-correct database and save yourself from potentially embarrassing auto-correct typos.

AutoCorrector app
Teach your iPhone or iPad people and place names with AutoCorrector. Screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

One of the first things I did when I got my iPad 2 was turn off the spelling auto-correction feature. It only took a few close calls for me to realize that it didn't always have my best interests at heart.

It only takes one visit to the site Damn You Auto Correct to see the depths to which the feature can sink. One poor soul tried to type "bed spread," but it came out as "bed sores." Another's "woo-hoo" became the much less exciting "wool noodle." Somewhere in Cupertino, Calif., Steve Jobs is laughing.

The new 99-cent AutoCorrector app for iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad is designed to renew your faith in auto-correction. It lets you add custom words and names to your iPhone's vocabulary or install a list of SMS shorthand words. There are a couple of swear words that AutoCorrector can't disable the auto-correct for, but otherwise it's highly effective.

I gave AutoCorrector a quick test drive. I started with one of my biggest auto-correct headaches by adding my last name to the list. Now my iPad no longer tries to change "Kooser" to "looser." I feel better already.

We have plenty of unusual town names around where I live in New Mexico. I just taught my iPad not to change "Tijeras" to "Tigers" or "To'Hajiilee" to "Toga oiler."

AutoCorrector won't absolve you of all auto-correct snafus, but it can reduce the chances for embarrassing typos. You will still have to be on your toes when messaging your friends about the stork clouds on the horizon, but at least "John Stamos" won't have to come across as "John Stamps."

 

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