Audio Slideshow: Hackers use tech to solve disaster relief challenges

At Hacker Dojo in Mountain View, Calif., developers come together with NASA, the World Bank, Google, Yahoo, and Microsoft to exchange emergency response ideas.

Last week at the Hacker Dojo in Mountain View, Calif. , developers partnered with Google, Yahoo, NASA, and the World Bank to exchange ideas and work on solutions for responding to natural disasters and other emergencies.

Random Hacks of Kindness is the first in a series of planned events that seek to use technology to solve real world problems related to crisis and disaster relief. By first working with governments and non-governmental organizations to better understand the immediate needs of rescuers and communities following a critical emergency, these programmers are work directly to solve communication issues and to better facilitate the exchange of information and resources in times of need.

Often, information comes from a wide array of sources during emergencies, including governments, rescuers, and victims in local communities. Successfully organizing the incoming content and delivering information back to the proper resource is a critical part of providing aid to victims.

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About the author

James Martin is the staff photographer at CNET News, covering the geeks and gadgets of Silicon Valley. When he's not live-blogging the latest product launches from Apple, Google, or Facebook, James can be found exploring NASA, probing robotics labs, and getting behind-the-scenes with some of the Bay Area's most innovative thinkers.

 

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