At the Vegas Goretorium, an all-out fright-fest

Come along as Crave takes a pre-Halloween behind-the-scenes tour of the spooky new Eli Roth house of horror on the Las Vegas Strip.

Goretorium tickets
Goretorium

LAS VEGAS--Halloween is descending in an orange and black fog of fun-size candy bars and store-bought costumes of everything from The Avengers to Skylanders.

To keep folks in chills before their epic trick or treating, every community across the U.S. has a haunted house or two. Usually, it's an old empty house or warehouse transformed into a realm of nightmarish evil -- or at least a joint full of plastic skeletons and employees in rubber masks.

That quaint, amateur-hour stuff won't fly in The Entertainment Capital of the World, however. The Las Vegas Strip demands a big-budget denizen of the damned, like the new, $10 million Eli Roth Goretorium.

The brainchild of "Hostel" filmmaker Eli Roth, this permanent installation across Las Vegas Blvd. from the Cosmopolitan and City Center tells the story of the Delmont hotel, where guests checked in to find a hell of abduction, torture, murder, and cannibalism.

The 15,000-square-foot attraction is open daily from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. with an entry fee ranging from $25 to $60.

Crave got to poke around behind the scenes of the Goretorium to see where the technicians control the horror show and where the attraction's cast of 75 actors prepare to terrorize the gutsy folks who dare to walk through the doors.

About the author

Crave freelancer John Scott Lewinski covers tech, cars, and entertainment out of Los Angeles. As a journalist, he's traveled from Daytona Beach to Cape Town, writing for more than 30 national magazines. He's also a very amateur boxer known for his surprising lack of speed and ability to absorb punishment. E-mail John.

 

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