AT&T Wireless is gouging customers on international roaming charges

AT&T Wireless is gouging customers. Why do we have to accept this?

I've written before about AT&T Wireless' terrible international roaming rates for the iPhone . Well, imagine my surprise to discover that its roaming rates for its wireless cards is even worse. How much worse? Consider the bill I received from AT&T today:

Matt Asay

Yes, that's really $1520.76 for one month's usage of my wireless card. But the shocking thing is that $1450.19 of it came from using the card for under three hours to pull down a total of 96 megabytes of data. That's roughly $15 per megabyte. What a bargain!

Given that my calling plan covers the US and Canada, I assumed my data plan would, too. Nope. I pay $59.99 per month for an "unlimited" data plan on my wireless card. It's surprising just how limited that "unlimited" plan is.

AT&T Wireless is gouging its customers (and no, I'm not the only one - this hapless fellow got dinged $6,000 by AT&T for using his phone in Mexico, while this iPhone user got hit with $3,000). $1,450 for a 96 megabytes is unconscionable. It bears no rational relation to AT&T's own costs of delivering the service.

UPDATE: TechCrunch has data that indicates AT&T's text messaging rates aren't so great, either. How about $1,310 per megabyte?

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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