At Open Source and the Cloud, IT opportunities and challenges

At the Open Source and the Cloud event next week we'll be discussing how open source and cloud work and play together. It's not as easy as you might think.

Just as open source has made it easier for developers to distribute software, the cloud has ushered in a new wave of consumption, turning on-premise IT from a necessity to an option.

Next week at the annual OSBC (Open Source Business Conference) in San Francisco, I'll be moderating a panel discussion on March 17 at 3 p.m. PST about open source and the cloud, and how the two play well together. (Note: fellow CNET blogger James Urquhart is a panelist.)

While open source offers users a great deal of control over their applications and data, the cloud requires users to not only follow the providers methodology, but also locks applications and data into a specific cloud platform.

The big question is if source code matters in the age of the cloud, and what do developers and IT staff need to know as their world evolves at a breakneck pace.

We'll also discuss whether any of this matters and if we've reached the point where consuming applications is more important than their origins and future plans. Maybe open APIs have supplanted open source?

Open Source and the Cloud: IT Opportunities and Challenges, March 17, 3 p.m.

Dave Rosenberg, Moderator
James Urquhart, Platform Evangelist, Cisco
Chris Mattman, Senior Computer Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Erica Brescia, CEO, BitRock

OSBC remains the must-attend open source event of the year. Stop by and say hello.

Tags:
Software
About the author

Dave Rosenberg has more than 15 years of technology and marketing experience that spans from Bell Labs to startup IPOs to open-source and cloud software companies. He is CEO and founder of Nodeable, co-founder of MuleSoft, and managing director for Hardy Way. He is an adviser to DataStax, IT Database, and Puppet Labs.

 

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