Astronauts don't cry: Chris Hadfield shows tears in space

The commander of the International Space Station shows how crying in space only leads to a big water bubble on your eye.

Astronaut Chris Hadfield explains what it's like to cry in space. Video screenshot by

There's no crying in baseball, and there's no crying in space.

While zero gravity doesn't have an impact on tears forming, it has an effect on if they fall -- and they don't. The water that builds up in your eyes from crying will stay there until the bubble gets so big it moves to another spot on your face, or it's removed. It's not very pretty or graceful.

Watch how Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield -- commander of the International Space Station and maker of all sorts of entertaining space videos -- demonstrates what happens when you cry in space. The tech-savvy astronaut tweeted in January that it can hurt to squirt tears in space, since they "don't shed."

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