Asana looks to cut down the noise in your in-box

The task-management company has unveiled a new feature called Inbox that's designed to show users only important e-mails.

Asana Inbox
Asana Inbox Asana

Task-management company Asana has unveiled a new way for its users to handle the e-mail overload in their in-box.

Dubbed Inbox, the feature is designed for the companies that are currently using Asana's task-management tool. With Inbox, team members can stay up-to-date on the latest events related to a particular task or project and avoid dealing with unnecessary e-mail threads, according to Asana.

At the center of that plan is a pane that provides "the entire history and up-to-date status of the work [a message is] about," in each message sent between team members. In addition, the feature is designed to let users follow particular projects and therefore get all of the updates related to them. On unfollowing a project, messages sent between team members will no longer be shared with the person who has unfollowed. According to Asana, users can also follow individual tasks on a project, and decide against following others.

Finally, Asana is trying to create what it calls "Inbox zero." Upon reading a message, Asana automatically archives it. For important messages, users can mark it as a "follow up," thus allowing them to access it at a later time.

It's important to point out that Asana's Inbox is available in its own toolset, and is reserved for those using the company's service. Asana claims that since its launch last November, "tens of thousands" of teams have used its service, including those at Foursquare, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Airbnb.

Asana allows teams with up to 30 members to use its service for free. Once teams reach 30 members, prices rise from $100 per month to $800 per month, depending on team size.

About the author

Don Reisinger is a technology columnist who has covered everything from HDTVs to computers to Flowbee Haircut Systems. Besides his work with CNET, Don's work has been featured in a variety of other publications including PC World and a host of Ziff-Davis publications.

 

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