Archos unveils TV+, Wi-Fi DVR

Portable video player manufacturer Archos releases details and photos of their new set-top DVR box, the Archos TV+ WiFi.

Photo of Archos TV+ Wi-Fi DVR.
The Archos TV+ is a set-top box that offers video recording, on-demand Wi-Fi video downloads, and a Web browser. Archos


Looks like Archos has finally let the cat out of the bag on their first set-top DVR, the Archos TV+. Offered in 80GB ($249) and 250GB ($349) versions, the Archos TV+ looks to do about everything the Apple TV failed to deliver, including: an onscreen recording guide; 640x480 video recording quality; a QWERTY remote control; an infrared emitter for controlling your cable box or TV; a built-in Wi-Fi and Ethernet that can be used for on-demand video downloads from CinemaNow; a fully-functional Opera web browser with Flash video support (YouTube, DailyMotion, CNET TV, etc.); optional Flash video game downloads; and it even includes cables (gasp!).

Photo of Archos TV+ remote control.
The Archos TV+ includes a QWERTY remote for browsing the web or searching for video content on Cinema Now. Archos

Like Apple TV, the Archos TV+ also allows you to stream existing audio, video, and photo content from your home PC. The Archos TV+ might not have the integrated iTunes support of its competition, but it is compatible with the vast swath of competitors that use DRM-protected WMV or WMA audio and video files. A USB 2.0 connection allows the Archos TV+ to be used as a hard drive for a tidy transfer of files on and off your PC. In addition, a USB 2.0 host connection offers the ability to transfer photos from your digital camera or connect any MSC-compatible MP3 or video player.

For those of you who have been procrastinating about building your own PC-based DVR (Mythbox, MediaCenter, BeyondTV), the Archos TV+ seems to offer a one-stop solution for recording, archiving, and transferring your favorite TV shows. Stay tuned for more coverage at CES 2008.

Photo of back of Archos TV+ DVR.
Hands-on with the Archos TV+. Here's the business end. HDMI output and Ethernet ports are on the right. Donald Bell/CNET Networks

About the author

Donald Bell has spent more than five years as a CNET senior editor, reviewing everything from MP3 players to the first three generations of the Apple iPad. He currently devotes his time to producing How To content for CNET, as well as weekly episodes of CNET's Top 5 video series.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
Nissan gives new Murano bold style (pictures)
Top great space moments in 2014 (pictures)
This is it: The Audiophiliac's top in-ear headphones of 2014 (pictures)
ZTE's wallet-friendly Grand X (pictures)
Lenovo reprises clever design for the Yoga Tablet 2 (Pictures)
Top-rated reviews of the week (pictures)