Apple's Korea after-sales policy the world's best, regulator says

According to the South Korea Fair Trade Commission, Apple has revised its after-sales policy in that country to help it reach the "world's best level."


Apple has updated its after-sales policy in South Korea, making it the world's best, according to a regulator in that country.

According to the Korea Herald, citing a statement from the country's Fair Trade Commission (FTC), Apple will now replace all defective products in that country with new devices within the first month of purchase. The company will even replace devices that become defective after the first month with a new model if the issue is obviously caused by a manufacturing issue. Apple had previously offered the policy to Korean customers with its iPhone last year, but has now expanded it to all of its devices, except for the iMac.

With that change, Korea's FTC says Apple is delivering to the country a top level of service.

"Apple confirmed that the renewed policy in Korea is the world's best level compared to [those] in other countries," FTC official Kim Chung-ki said today at a news conference, according to the Korea Herald.

Korea has become a leader in consumer-friendly after-sales policies. On April 1, the country started enforcing a bill that requires companies to adhere to stringent government regulations on after-sales policies. In the event companies don't do so, they'd be required to note that on their product packaging.

Apple's after-care policies have become an integral component in its success at establishing strong customer relationships. Aside from a standard policy that offers a full refund on iPhone returns within 30 days, the company's paid AppleCare service covers everything from regular defects to accidental damage.

Back in October, Apple unveiled the iPhone AppleCare+ plan, allowing iPhone owners to extend their one-year warranty and 90 days of tech support to two years. The plan includes two incidents of accidental damage and costs $99.

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