Apple's biggest quarter by the numbers

CNET breaks down some of the major numbers from Apple's record-breaking quarter and looks at how they stack up to years past.

Apple broke all kinds of records yesterday with its monster earnings report.

With those results in the rear view mirror, now's as good a time as any to sit back and take a look at what they mean. Below are some of the big or otherwise notable facts and figures to chew on.

$46.33 billion. That was Apple's total revenue from the quarter, an all-time record and 73 percent better than the company did during the same quarter last year.

$13.06 billion. Apple's profit for the quarter, more than double what it did during the same quarter last year.

$32.5 billion. That's the revenue Apple predicts it will bring in the current quarter. It's nothing as big as this quarter, but it would be about a 32 percent increase from the same quarter a year ago.

Apple sold more than 37 million iPhones in the quarter.
Apple sold more than 37 million iPhones in the quarter. Apple

37.04 million. The number of iPhones Apple sold during the quarter, the most it's ever sold in any quarter and a direct result of the release of the iPhone 4S in October.

Apple did not provide a breakdown of which models contributed to the total, but it did say that the majority were the iPhone 4S. By comparison, Apple sold 72 million iPhones during all of fiscal 2011, and 40 million in 2010. Worth noting is that this is the first year Apple's offered a lineup of three iPhones at once; the company continues to sell the iPhone 3GS alongside the iPhone 4 and 4S.

It's so many iPhones, in fact, that if you run the math--as we wrote about yesterday --Apple actually sold more iPhones per day than people born in the world each day during the same time period.

15.43 million. The number of iPads Apple sold during the quarter, which is another record breaker and a 111 percent increase from the same quarter last year. To put that in perspective, Apple sold 32 million iPads during its fiscal 2011.

That volume of iPads ends up being higher than PC sales by rivals, at least according to research firm IDC. As Computerworld notes, IDC research pegs Hewlett-Packard as the top PC maker in the last quarter, shipping 15.1 million computers in its fourth quarter. It's also higher than Lenovo's 13 million and Dell's 11.9 million unit counts.

15.4 million. The number of iPods Apple sold during the quarter. That's down 21 percent from how many iPods Apple sold last year, even with price cuts Apple introduced to the iPod Touch and iPod Nano in October.

All told, net sale of the iPod came in at $897 million. That accounted for 5 percent of Apple's net sales this quarter as opposed to 13 percent during the same quarter last year. Apple still maintains that the iPod holds a 70 percent plus share of the U.S. market for MP3 players, as per data from the NPD group.

Apple's Portables helped push the company to record Mac sales. The company passed the 5 million unit threshold for the first time. Most of those were MacBook Airs and Pros, the company said.
Apple's Portables helped push the company to record Mac sales. The company passed the 5 million unit threshold for the first time. Most of those were MacBook Airs and Pros, the company said. Apple

5.2 million. How many Macs Apple sold in its first quarter. That's an all-time record, and up 26 percent from a year ago. As with its other products, Apple doesn't break down how many units each model sold, except to say that the most growth was with its portables, the MacBook Air and the MacBook Pro.

1.4 million. How many Apple TV set-top boxes Apple sold in its first quarter. That's a tiny number compared to the rest of the company's products, but one thing to keep in mind is that Apple sold 2.8 million Apple TVs in all its fiscal 2011. During yesterday's earnings call, Apple CEO Tim Cook said it was still a "hobby," but he said he " couldn't live without it ."

Hobby? The Apple TV is still considered one by Apple, but the company sold 1.4 million of the things this quarter.
Hobby? The Apple TV is still considered one by Apple, but the company sold 1.4 million of the things this quarter. Apple

85 million. That's how many people are using Apple's iCloud. That metric was not in the company's earnings release, or its quarterly report. Instead, it came during Apple's earnings call yesterday, with Cook saying "it is just not a product. It is a strategy for the next decade."

$1.7 billion. Apple's net sales of Apple's iTunes Store. That includes the iTunes Store, App Store and iBookstore. Add on "iPod services and Apple branded and third-party iPod accessories," and Apple pulled in $2.02 billion in net sales, a 42 percent increase from the same quarter last year.

$4 billion. How much Apple has paid to App Store developers cumulatively. That works out to $700,000 in payments to developments during the quarter, as per Apple Insider's math. That's adding on to the more than $3 billion number Apple announced at its iPhone 4S unveiling in October.

$30.15 billion. Apple's cash and cash equivalents and short-term securities. In plain English, that's the sum Apple could choose to spend on reasonably short notice. Add in long-term securities, which can be difficult to convert quickly to cash, and that sum rises to $97.6 billion.

During yesterday's earnings call, Apple's chief financial officer, Peter Oppenheimer, attempted to avoid any questions about what the company was planning to do with all that money.

"We recognize that the cash is growing for all of the right reasons," Oppenheimer said. "And I would characterize our discussions today as active, about what makes the most sense to do with the cash balance. But, we don't have anything to announce specifically today."

$783 million. How much Apple spent on research and development in the quarter. That's up $183 million, or 32 percent, from the $575 million Apple spent during the same quarter last year. In its quarterly report filed earlier today with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Apple said the bump is "due primarily to an increase in headcount and related expenses to support expanded R&D activities."

Of note, this is actually the lowest Apple's spent on R&D by percentage of its total revenues. That's a trend that's been on its way down since 2008 , bolstered by growing sales.

Apple's retail stores had 110 million visitors during the quarter, up 45 percent from last year.
Apple's retail stores had 110 million visitors during the quarter, up 45 percent from last year. James Martin/CNET

41,800. The number of full-time equivalent employees working in Apple's retail stores.

110 million. How many people visited Apple's retail stores during the quarter, a 45 percent bump from the 76 million vistors that Apple pulled in during the same quarter last year. If you break that down by the company's average of 358 stores that were open, it's 22,000 visitors per store, per week.

$6.1 billion. Apple's net sales at its retail stores for the quarter. That's a 59 percent bump from the same quarter last year, where Apple raked in $3.84 billion from its stores.

148 percent. That was the jump in Apple's sales in Japan for the quarter compared with the same quarter last year. Japan accounted for $3.5 billion of Apple's net sales up from $1.4 billion last year.

 

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