Apple wants to make super-secure magnetic mount for iPad

A patent application shows the company's vision for an easy way to mount and remove an iPad for cars, tripods, treadmills, and more.

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Apple wants to make a magnetic stand for iPads that will hold the tablet securely in place, while also allowing for quick removal when needed, according to a patent application published today.

Spotted by Patently Apple, the application includes images of various tablet mounting situations, including inside cars, on tripods, treadmills, and on a music sheet stand. Apple even thinks the technology could be used to connect two iPads with a magnetic hinge.

Apple writes in the application:

Tablet devices are used in an increasingly wide range of applications. In many of these applications a way for conveniently mounting the device is required. A number of manufacturers have tried to produce such a device; however since most tablets have no built-in mounting mechanism, mounting devices tend to be somewhat cumbersome and generally do not allow for easy removal.

Therefore, what is desired is a way for securely attaching a tablet device to a stand where it can be removed and replaced with ease.

Apple also makes note that there will be a shield in place on the magnetic mounting to protect other nearby devices that are sensitive to strong magnetic fields. This probably would apply to credit cards swiped in a card reader attached to an iPad.

Two iPads are better than one? U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

About the author

Donna Tam covers Amazon and other fun stuff for CNET News. She is a San Francisco native who enjoys feasting, merrymaking, checking her Gmail and reading her Kindle.

 

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