Apple issues iTunes and iMovie updates

The new iTunes version adds iOS 6 support and fixes a few security bugs, and iMovie corrects a bug with third-party components.

In the wake of today's iPhone 5 and iPod announcements, Apple has issued updates for iTunes and its iMovie home video-editing software. The updates should be available through Software Update for those who have these programs installed on their systems, but they can also be downloaded as standalone installers from Apple's Web site.

The iTunes update adds support for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch devices running iOS 6, and also adds support for Apple's latest iPod Nano and Shuffle devices. In addition, the update addresses a memory corruption security bug in WebKit for Windows that could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code on systems running older versions of iTunes.

The update is available for OS X as an 175MB (approximately) download, and for Windows (both 32-bit and 64-bit) as a 75MB (approximately) download; it can be obtained for all supported platforms from the iTunes Web site.

Apple's update for iMovie is a small patch that addresses an issue in which third-party Quicktime components, such as those for the popular 3ivx codec, could prevent iMovie from opening properly. If you've been experiencing crashes in iMovie at launch, then you may benefit from this update, which like iTunes is available through Software Update but also can be downloaded from the iMovie 9.0.8 Web page. While the update only addresses a small issue, it is a substantial download at just more than a gigabyte in size.

As always, be sure to back up your systems before installing these or any other updates.

See CNET's full coverage of Apple's iPhone 5 event.

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