Apple invents privacy eyewear for confidential information, gaming

Apple has applied for a patent to cover a great new invention that would allow users to wear specially designed eyewear to view confidential information while using their mobile devices. The patent also covers gamers who are playing multiplayer games.

Patently Apple

Apple has applied for a patent to cover a great new invention that would allow users to wear specially designed eyewear to view confidential information while using their mobile devices. The patent also covers gamers who are playing multiplayer games.

The gist of how this is works is that a user can set the device, be it an iPhone, iPad, or notebook, to privacy mode, wherein the software would allow the option of obfuscating the information displayed on the screen. The glasses would decipher the display so that any potential onlookers would only see a scrambled mess, whereas the user would see the entire message.

From a practical standpoint, think of those times when you need to check your bank balance, write a sensitive e-mail, or visit a site that you do not wish others to know about. All that would be private, though wearing the glasses would most likely tip others off that you're into something confidential.

Patently Apple

Gamers may get the most out of this invention, though. The patent application suggests that not only are these privacy glasses good for concealing information, they can also be used to initiate 3D technology as well as allow multiplayer games to be viewed by several competing players, processing different information from each.

Of course, this is merely an application and the likelihood that we see a product based on this invention in the next couple years is low. But, it is something to be aware of as the now Jobs-less Apple continues moving forward, innovating products.

For a detailed overview of the entire patent applications, check out Patently Apple's report.

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