Apple demands Google hand over data for Motorola case

The company files a "motion to compel compliance with a subpoena" against Google in its ongoing case with Motorola.

Apple is asking a U.S. District Court judge to force Google to comply with a subpoena on data the iPhone maker says will aid its case against Motorola.

Apple earlier this week filed a "motion to compel compliance with a subpoena" in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, San Jose Division. Patently Apple was first to discover the filing and reported on it today.

Google was slapped with a subpoena in August, requiring the company to hand over pertinent information for the discovery phase of a case that Apple is building against Motorola. According to Apple, Google has not fully complied with that subpoena, which prompted the company to ask the court to enforce it.

Apple's patent-infringement claims are against a wide range of Motorola Mobility devices. However, Motorola is owned by Google, and some of the claims Apple has brought against the company involve Google's Android operating system. A few of the patent-infringement claims also relate to Motorola's set-top-box business, which will be sold to Arris, pending closing conditions. Regardless, Apple wants information from Google on those patents.

It's not clear how Google will respond, but the company has the right to issue a brief in opposition of Apple's assertion that the search company has failed to comply.

Google declined CNET's request for comment on the motion. CNET has also contacted Apple for comment. We will update this story when we have more information.

Featured Video
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

Details about Apple's 'spaceship' campus from the drone pilot who flies over it

MyithZ has one of the most popular aerial photography channels on YouTube. With the exception of revealing his identity, he is an open book as he shares with CNET's Brian Tong the drone hardware he uses to capture flyover shots of the construction of Apple's new campus, which looks remarkably like an alien craft.

by Brian Tong