Anti-aging cream made with 'space diamonds'

Beautify yourself like an astronaut. 111 Skin unveils an anti-aging cream it claims is made from black diamond particles formed in space.

Celestial cream
This may be your chance to rub some space into your skin. 111 Skin

Anti-aging! Space diamonds! Groundbreaking medical research! Wow, Celestial Black Diamond Night Cream sure sounds like a miracle. Let's take a closer look.

The product description says the cream includes black diamond particles "believed to have formed in space." Huh? Either they came from space, or they didn't. Manufacturer 111 Skin doesn't divulge the sourcing method for the particles, but it does describe them as "microspheres that penetrate the deeper dermal layer of the skin in order to transport three essential youth restoring ingredients: patent-pending NAC Y2 formula, Collagen type I and III and Hyaluronic acid."

A query to 111 Skin's press person about the origin of the diamond particles has so far gone unanswered. So where do they come from? Have they fallen to Earth like David Bowie? Is there some top-secret space mining operation going on that we don't know about it? I expect the speculation is a lot more exciting than the reality.

Manufacturer 111 Skin has a whole section of its "About Us" page dedicated to the company's "space scientists." "Dr. Tarlev and Dr. Popov have spent much of their careers discovering and testing ingredients that protect cells against extreme environmental conditions (especially space and deep sea), and developing supplements for the submarine fleet and for astronauts," it reads.

What we have here is a cream that costs $900 per 50ml, made with a substance that may or may not be from space, and that claims to help stimulate cell regeneration and leave you with a glowing, youthful complexion. Perhaps Ponce de Leon was heading in the wrong direction when he ended up in Florida during his quest for the Fountain of Youth. He should have built a rocket ship instead.

(Via Luxury Launches)

About the author

Freelance writer Amanda C. Kooser covers gadgets and tech news with a twist for CNET's Crave blog. When not wallowing in weird gadgets and iPad apps for cats, she can be found tinkering with her 1956 DeSoto.

 

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