Anonymous ready to roll in post-LulzSec world

The hacking group releases information that came apparently from a federal cyberterrorism-defense training program.

Anonymous is picking up where the apparently disbanded LulzSec left off.

The hacking organization released information to the Web last night that came from the Cyberterrorism Defense Initiative's Security and Network Training Initiative and National Education Laboratory (Sentinel) program. The Sentinel program is administered by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to "educate technical personnel in cyberterrorism response and prevention."

The Sentinel training program was designed for workers in public safety, law enforcement, state and local government, and public utilities. Health care professionals and employees at colleges and universities have also trained in the program.

Anonymous used its Twitter account yesterday to announce its intention to post data from the program on the Web, asking its followers if they were "ever interested in anti-cyberterrorism training." Not long after, Anonymous published information on the program.

According to Australia's ABC broadcasting network, the files--which were apparently published in 2009--include information on publicly available hacking resources and lists of FBI bureau addresses. The data also includes information on "hacking and counter-hacking tools," as well as form letters that could be used to obtain user information from Internet service providers, the ABC reported.

The latest data release from Anonymous comes less than two days after its fellow hacking group LulzSec announced that it had disbanded . The group said in a statement Saturday that it had planned to operate for just 50 days with the ultimate goal of putting people on notice.

"It's time to say bon voyage," LulzSec wrote in its statement. "Our planned 50 day cruise has expired, and we must now sail into the distance, leaving behind--we hope--inspiration, fear, denial, happiness, approval, disapproval, mockery, embarrassment, thoughtfulness, jealousy, hate, even love. If anything, we hope we had a microscopic impact on someone, somewhere. Anywhere."

Over that 50-day period, LulzSec made headlines by attacking PBS, Sony Pictures, and the Central Intelligence Agency, among other prominent organizations. More recently, the group announced an alliance with Anonymous called Operation Anti-Security, or AntiSec. The goal of their alliance, they said earlier this month, was "to steal and leak any classified government information...Prime targets are banks and other high-ranking establishments."

The groups said that if they were censored in any way, "we will obliterate the censor with cannonfire anointed with lizard blood."

The Sentinel release is a continuation of AntiSec. Following LulzSec's disbandment, the group's members apparently joined Anonymous and continued the operation.

"We can confirm that all @LulzSec members have reported aboard," Anonymous wrote on its Twitter account yesterday. "#AntiSec will have full support from #Anonymous and LulzSec. Expect us, soon."

 

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