Angry Birds to fly into Starbucks?

The game's creator, Rovio, is reportedly planning to launch virtual goods and have electronic leader boards in Starbucks stores.

What else will Angry Birds try to sell?
What else will Angry Birds try to sell? Stephen Shankland/CNET

Rovio is closing in on a deal with Starbucks that will bring the company's famed franchise, Angry Birds, into the coffee shops.

According to an interview Bloomberg conducted with Rovio Senior Vice President Wibe Wagemans, the Angry Birds maker could soon bring electronic leader boards to Starbucks stores to promote top-scoring players. In addition, the companies will offer Starbucks customers exclusive in-store promotions, including virtual goods.

"It's tying in the real world with the virtual world," Wagemans told Bloomberg. "Retailers get new customers who've not been to their stores yet, and repeat customers."

Although exact details on the deal were not divulged, it seems to play into Rovio's strategy with Angry Birds. Aside from selling the title on a host of mobile platforms, including iOS and Android, the company has sold everything from shirts to plush toys to monetize its brand.

Related stories:
• Angry Birds in real life--tabletop game, plush toys
• Rovio to offer Angry Birds baby merchandise
• Up next: Angry Birds, the cookbook and movie

But it hasn't even come close to stopping there. Last month, Reuters reported that Rovio is planning to sell baby merchandise featuring its animations to add to its ruler and notebook school kit, backpacks, and socks. Earlier this year, Rovio also mentioned plans to launch a cookbook and movie .

If Rovio and Starbucks do arrive at a deal, it won't be the first time the company has partnered with a retailer. Earlier this year, Rovio said that Barnes & Noble customers for a limited time could get Angry Birds stickers and temporary tattoos in stores.

 

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