Android users get less-capable Google voice search

Users of T-Mobile's G1 will soon be able to search with their voice. There's one little hiccup though: you can't just lift your phone to your head.

A correction has been made to this story. See below for details.

As mentioned in an earlier post about the upcoming firmware update for T-Mobile's G1, the built-in Google search tool is getting voice-powered search. Like Google's rule-breaking , first-party iPhone search application , users can simply talk into the application to have their queries transcribed into text.

Google

The big difference, however, is that users will need to begin a voice search by tapping the microphone icon instead of simply holding their phone up to their face.

Why is this you ask? The G1 is missing the oh-so-important proximity sensor, which on the iPhone tells the application you're holding it up to your face. Also, the app doesn't make use of the G1's accelerometer, which means it can't fake knowing you're lifting it from palm to head. In the iPhone iteration, the application uses both of these sensors in tandem to do its voice searching magic.

No doubt future Android devices that have either sensor will fall in line with the iPhone's offering, such as the long-rumored G2 . Until then G1 users will need to tap first.

Correction: This blog initially misstated why the G1 app does not allow you to just hold the phone up to your face. The T-Mobile G1 does have an accelerometer, but the application does not make use of it.

About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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