Android Ice Cream Sandwich gains, but Gingerbread dominates

Google's Android 4.0 is picking up steam but still pales next to mainstay Gingerbread.

Android 4.x "Ice Cream Sandwich" is making gains, though Gingerbread still takes the lion's share, according to a snapshot of data provided to Android developers.

Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) had about a 2.9 percent share and Honeycomb had more than a 3 percent share, according to Android Developers, which describes the data as "the relative number of active devices running a given version of the Android platform."

ICS started appearing in devices only toward the end of last year.

The Web site says the data can help developers "understand the landscape of device distribution and decide how to prioritize the development of your application features for the devices currently in the hands of users."

Android 2.x Gingerbread was just a little shy of 70 percent.

Chart showing the number of Android devices that have accessed Google Play (formerly Android Market) within a 14-day period ending on April 2
Chart showing the number of Android devices that have accessed Google Play (formerly Android Market) within a 14-day period ending on April 2. Android Developers


Chart showing the number of Android devices that have accessed Google Play (formerly Android Market) within a 14-day period ending on April 2
Chart showing the number of Android devices that have accessed Google Play (formerly Android Market) within a 14-day period ending on April 2 Android Developers

A year earlier (March 17, 2011), Android 2.2 was on top and Android 3.0 at a trifling 0.2 percent.

In an introduction to a historical distribution chart, the Android Developers page illustrates compatibility by showing versions "stacked on top of each other"--what is sometimes referred to less charitably as fragmentation.

A chart on a Motorola support page mirrors the staggered rollout of Android on various devices. For example, Motorola's newest tablet the Xyboard (aka, "Xoom 2") currently runs Android 3.2.2 but won't see ICS until the third quarter of 2012.

Via Engadget

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The most anticipated games of 2015
Tech industry's high-flying 2014
Uber's tumultuous ups and downs in 2014 (pictures)
The best and worst quotes of 2014 (pictures)
A roomy range from LG (pictures)
This plain GE range has all of the essentials (pictures)