Andreessen Horowitz makes $90M investment in Tanium

Investment is the first VC infusion in the enterprise management startup since its founding in 2007.

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Andreessen Horowitz partner and co-founder Marc Andreessen. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz announced Sunday it is making a $90 million investment in enterprise management startup Tanium.

The investment, Andreessen Horowitz's second largest after its $100 million investment in GitHub in 2012, values the seven-year-old startup at $900 million, according to the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the deal. Andreessen Horowitz co-founder and general partner Marc Andreessen said in a Twitter post that it was the first VC investment in the Berkeley, Calif.-based startup since its founding in 2007.

"Tanium is a breakthrough like we've never seen," Andreessen wrote, noting that the investment firm's partners have roughly 200 years of combined experience in systems management. "[The] Company's operating under radar, but its customers could not be more enthusiastic. Product must be seen to be believed. It's amazing."

Founded by David Hindawi and his son Orion, Tanium helps IT professionals manage and secure devices on their network.

"Enterprise networks have grown exponentially during the last decade while the technology to secure and manage these systems has stagnated. The result is that simple, preventable issues result in debilitating outages and attacks cannot be identified or managed until it's too late," Orion Hindawi, the company's chief technology officer, said in a statement. "By completely rethinking how IT professionals manage, secure and maintain the end points in their network Tanium gives them the ability to interrogate, manage update and secure their systems in a fraction of the time."

As part of the investment, former Microsoft executive and current Andreessen Horowitz partner Steven Sinofsky will join Tanium's board.

"We love the opportunity to partner with enterprise companies that are either working to radically improve the way a given IT need is met with software -- or transforming the IT landscape by re-creating or re-defining the traditional categories with unique software," Sinofsky said in a blog post.

 

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