And the iPad 2 display rumor of the week is...

iPad 2 rumors are coming fast and furious lately. A report today focuses on the display--or, rather, the lack of a super-high-resolution Retina display.

iPad 2 reports--er, rumors--are getting difficult to keep track of, but let's put this one in the no-high-resolution-display hopper.

After repeating fairly well-established hearsay about a dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 processor (running at 1.2GHz), an analyst cited by Apple Insider says the iPad 2 will not have a high-resolution Retina display, corroborating an earlier CNET report . Reason? Manufacturing yields aren't there yet. But "anti-reflection" is mentioned as a step-up in display quality.

Another display consideration not mentioned is cost: adding a super-high-resolution display to the iPad 2 could drive up the cost significantly, pricing it out of the more cost-conscious Android tablet market.

Don't dismay, though, the iPad 2 will focus on processing punch, keeping it competitive with Motorola's Xoom and RIM's BlackBerry PlayBook, among other upcoming designs packing high-performance silicon. And, like other tablets from top-tier suppliers, the iPad 2 will have a better graphics chip, too.

And, again, repeating previous rumors, the next-gen iPad is slated to be slimmer, shaving off as much as 35 percent of the current iPad's chassis.

The report also mentions 3G modes: The iPad 2 will add a CDMA model using a Qualcomm chip, and a separate GSM model will use a chip from Infineon (note that Intel is in the process of buying that company's wireless business). This contradicts some earlier reports of a dual-mode iPad 2 (and iPhone 5).

When is all of this going to happen? 4.5 million to 5 million units will ship in the first quarter, with delivery late first quarter or early second quarter, the report says.

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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