Analyst: Apple MacBook to make gains on PC

Apple's position in the PC market will get stronger through the rest of the year at the expense of Windows PC makers, according to a Deutsche Bank analyst.

Apple's MacBook is set to make market share gains on PCs in the second half, according to a research note from a Deutsche Bank analyst.

As demand for consumer Windows PCs softens a bit, Apple will be in a position to a grab market share, according to a research note released today from Deutsche Bank analyst Chris Whitmore.

"Our recent checks with the PC supply chain suggest overall orders have softened modestly in the past several weeks due to weaker European and U.S. Consumer NB (notebook) demand and more conservative back-to-school expectations from OEMs," he wrote.

This may set up an opportunity for Apple. "Within the computing market, we see significant opportunity for Apple to take meaningful share in the second half as the Microsoft/PC ecosystem is relatively stagnant, lacking meaningful new offerings," he said.

The 2011 MacBook Air lineup will give Apple a leg up in the PC market, according to an analyst.
The 2011 MacBook Air lineup will give Apple a leg up in the PC market, according to an analyst. Apple

Whitmore continued. "Apple will be competing with an upgraded Mac OS, new MacBook Airs...and a new iPad iOS."

PC makers won't have a strong response until 2012 because Ultrabooks --essentially the PC equivalent of the MacBook Air--won't be shipping in large enough volumes to drive down costs below the Air until 2012, Whitmore wrote.

And Apple remains dominant in the tablet market, too. "Within the Tablet market, the iPad remains the gold standard as competitors struggle for mindshare and traction (note HP's price cuts on the TouchPad)," Whitmore wrote.

Overall, Deutsche Bank's PC unit growth estimate this year is 4 percent.

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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