Amped Wireless intros 802.11ac range extender, USB 3.0 adapter

At CES 2013, Amped Wireless showcases its first 802.11ac range extender and USB 3.0 802.11ac adapter.

The ACA1 USB 3.0 802.11ac adapter connects to a computer via a USB cable.
The ACA1 USB 3.0 802.11ac adapter connects to a computer via a USB cable. Dong Ngo/CNET

LAS VEGAS--Amped Wireless has invested a lot in the new 802.11ac standard.

In addition to its first 802.11ac router, the RTA15, shown here at CES 2013, the company also showed off its first USB 802.11ac adapter and range extender, which may be the first 802.11ac range extender on the market.

The ACA1 High Power Dual Band AC Wi-Fi USB Adapter is designed to add long-range 802.11ac Wi-Fi connectivity to Windows or Mac computers. Amped Wireless says it features two high-gain, dual-band antennas and four total amplifiers to maximize performance. The adapter supports USB 3.0 and is backward-compatible with 802.11a/b/g/n networks.

Unlike the USB 3.0 adapter from Trendnet , the ACA1, which is much larger, can't be mounted directly on a USB port; instead, it connects to a computer via a USB cable.

The REA20 Range Extender comes with five Gigabit LAN ports for adding wired devices to an existing Wi-Fi network.
The REA20 Range Extender comes with five Gigabit LAN ports for adding wired devices to an existing Wi-Fi network. Dong Ngo

The new range extender, called the REA20 High Power Dual Band AC 700mW Wi-Fi Range Extender, is designed to extend the range of any 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi network. It has three high-gain antennas and 10 total power amplifiers: four 5GHz 700mW, two-stage amplifiers, two 2.4GHz amplifiers, and four low-noise amplifiers, for a promised Wi-Fi coverage of up to 10,000 square feet.

The REA20 also has a USB port for file sharing and five Gigabit Ethernet wired ports for connecting additional wired devices.

Both the ACA1 and the REA20 are slated to be available early this year, with pricing to be announced then.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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