Amnesty Hypercube now does Facebook too

Amnesty Hypercube's got a Facebook app, so how far into the widget-hole do you want to go?

Been looking for a way to get the 'peanut butter jelly time' guy onto Facebook? Look no longer. CNET Networks

Amnesty Hypercube, which is probably the best name I've seen this year, has a new Facebook app that's pretty handy if you're a user of their desktop application. Like its other "Amnesty" services, the new app from the folks at Mesa Dynamics takes pretty much any widget code you can throw at it, and runs it in Facebook. In turn, it syncs up with Amnesty's desktop widget app, meaning any widgets you add at home will be available without having to re-add them.

There are several reasons why this is useful. One is for the widgets you enjoy using on your iGoogle page, or OS X Dashboard can now be viewed right in Facebook instead. If you're the kind of person who spends a lot of time there, this might beat keeping an extra browser tab open. This also takes an extra step out of managing one of your Facebook apps, which is especially helpful if you've got quite a few.

The only bummer here is the interface which relegates each widget to its own mini tab in Facebook, meaning you can't view all of them at once like you can with other widget services. You also can't stick them on your profile, which could arguably be a good thing considering how crowded people's profiles have become. What I was really hoping for with this service, was a way to take any widget code and stick it on your profile similar to what you can do with MySpace, although in a more user friendly fashion, and without the need to add a new Facebook application every time. I'm not saying the idea here isn't well-founded, but if you're looking for straight up widgets, you're probably better off using a bona fide widget aggregation site than surfing a bunch of tabs.

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About the author

Josh Lowensohn joined CNET in 2006 and now covers Apple. Before that, Josh wrote about everything from new Web start-ups, to remote-controlled robots that watch your house. Prior to joining CNET, Josh covered breaking video game news, as well as reviewing game software. His current console favorite is the Xbox 360.

 

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