Amid unrest, Egypt went offline (roundup)

Following widespread street protests, a country of more than 80 million people found itself almost entirely disconnected from the rest of the world for five days.

Following widespread street protests demanding an end to autocratic rule by President Hosni Mubarak, a country of more than 80 million people found itself almost entirely disconnected from the rest of the world. Here's how the story has unfolded:

Protesters in Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 28, 2011.
This still from a CBS News video shows protesters out on the streets of Cairo on the fourth day of demonstrations against the Egyptian government. Screenshot by Jonathan Skillings/CNET

Vodafone: We were forced to send pro-Mubarak texts

Egyptian government of President Hosni Mubarak forced carrier to send prescripted, propagandistic text messages during recent unrest, Vodafone says.
(Posted in Politics and Law by Lance Whitney)
February 3, 2011 11:43 AM PST

U.S. defended Egyptian activist's YouTube videos

WikiLeaks cable shows U.S. State Department talked Google into restoring YouTube video showing torture and murder by Egypt's state police.
(Posted in Privacy Inc. by Declan McCullagh)
February 2, 2011 11:30 PM PST

Egypt gets its Internet back

After a five-day shutdown and a pledge that President Hosni Mubarak won't seek re-election, Egyptians now can use Internet services again.
(Posted in Deep Tech by Stephen Shankland)
February 2, 2011 3:40 AM PST

Senators decry link between Egypt, 'kill switch' bill

Joseph Lieberman and two other senators who hope to hand the president emergency Internet authority are protesting comparisons to Egypt cutting off the Net.
• Poll: Internet 'kill switch'--help or hindrance?
(Posted in Privacy Inc. by Declan McCullagh)
February 2, 2011 4:30 AM PST

Google, Twitter build Speak to Tweet for Egyptians

With Internet service in Egypt all but extinct amid massive protests, those with simple voice connections can now get messages out on Twitter.
(Posted in Relevant Results by Tom Krazit)
January 31, 2011 3:02 PM PST

Al Jazeera calls for bloggers to spread Egypt news

Following the closure of its Cairo office by the Egyptian government, Arab broadcaster Al Jazeera is asking those in Egypt to use social media to get the word out about the country's ongoing protest movement.
(Posted in Politics and Law by Lance Whitney)
January 31, 2011 9:12 AM PST

Egypt's Internet disconnect reaches 24 hours

It was a full day ago that Egypt's network links to the rest of the world began to die, and a televised address from the country's president indicates that no end is in sight.
(Posted in Privacy Inc. by Declan McCullagh)
January 28, 2011 2:43 p.m. PT

Getting news out of an unplugged Egypt

Al Jazeera streams Egypt protests while people turn to old-fashioned landlines and faxes to get information in and out of the country.
(Posted in InSecurity Complex by Elinor Mills)
January 28, 2011 11:04 a.m. PT

Egypt's Internet goes dark during political unrest

In a stunning turn of events for the 21st-century Internet, a nation of more than 80 million people finds itself almost entirely disconnected from the rest of the world.
(Posted in Privacy Inc. by Declan McCullagh)
January 28, 2011 10:50 a.m. PT

Internet disruptions hit Egypt

It's unclear how widespread the service disruptions are and what is causing them.
(Posted in InSecurity Complex by Elinor Mills)
January 27, 2011 5:06 p.m. PT

Facebook: Egypt hasn't blocked us yet

The social network says traffic from the North African country, where activist protests have led to a crackdown on access to social media, has not experienced any "major changes."
(Posted in The Social by Caroline McCarthy)
January 26, 2011 10:56 a.m. PT

There's no such thing as 'social media revolution'

Or to put it another way: If activists using Twitter go on to topple a government, the real story should be that the government got toppled, not that the revolution was tweeted.
(Posted in The Social by Caroline McCarthy)
January 26, 2011 4:00 a.m. PT

Why Twitter is mum on Egypt block

The company doesn't want to comment on persistent reports that Twitter.com is inaccessible amid anti-government protests.Perhaps it's still in the dark about what's happening.
(Posted in The Social by Caroline McCarthy)
January 25, 2011 11:33 a.m. PT

 

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