Amazon wins FCC approval to sell Kindle Fire HD

The Internet retailer introduced its new high-end tablet last month before the key step of securing regulatory approval.

Amazon's Kindle Fire HD. Josh Miller/CNET

Amazon's new Kindle Fire HD 4G tablet has received clearance from the Federal Communications Commission, Amazon told Reuters today.

Although the device was unveiled last month, Amazon had not yet received the commission's approval to sell the device, which is required of all new wireless communications devices to assure device safety and prevent spectrum interference issues.

Amazon Web pages and e-mails promoting the high-end device included a disclaimer indicating it still required regulatory approval. "We will send you an email asking you to confirm your pre-order of Kindle Fire when it is approved for sale by the Federal Communications Commission," the Internet retail giant informed Kindle shoppers.

The current Fire HD is available only as a 7-inch Wi-Fi edition. Amazon plans to begin selling two 8.9-inch versions in November, one that is Wi-Fi only and one equipped with 4G LTE.

Companies typically go through the process of securing FCC approval before announcing new products. However, attorneys and observers familiar with the FCC compliance procedures said last month that the agency was unlikely to reject or prolong the process, despite the inclusion of 4G LTE wireless connectivity.

CNET has contacted Amazon for comment and will update this report when we learn more.

About the author

Steven Musil is the night news editor at CNET News. Before joining CNET News in 2000, Steven spent 10 years at various Bay Area newspapers.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
Seven tips for securing your Facebook account
The best 3D-printing projects of 2014 (pictures)
15 crazy old phones from a Korean museum (pictures)
10 gloriously geeky highlights from 2014 (pictures)
2015.5 Volvo XC60: updated tech, understated design
Busted! CNET readers show us their broken devices (pictures)