Amazon: We're selling over 1 million Kindles per week

The Kindle Fire has received its lumps in the media because of a minimalist feature set, but Amazon likes what it sees in the numbers.

Amazon

Amazon announced today that Kindle devices, and the Kindle Fire in particular, continue to fly out of the warehouse in dizzying numbers.

"For the third week in a row, customers are purchasing well over 1 million Kindle devices per week, and Kindle Fire remains the #1 bestselling, most gifted, and most wished for product across the millions of items available on Amazon.com since its introduction 11 weeks ago," the company said.

And it's getting more popular by the week, with sales increasing week over week for each of the past three weeks, according to Amazon.

The Fire, which has taken its lumps in the media because of a minimalist feature set, is nonetheless the most successful product Amazon has ever launched, according to today's announcement. "And we're building millions more to meet the high demand."

Amazon did not break out specific numbers for the Kindle Fire versus other Kindle products.

"We spotted that uptick in Kindle Fire sales. So, we can confirm that the trend continues," said Carter Nicholas, CEO of eDataSource. The market researcher, which tracks sales through Amazon.com, showed data earlier this month that jibes with what Amazon is saying. Sales jumped around November 15--when the Fire went on sale--and have been generally trending upward ever since.

And analysts see plenty of opportunity for low-budget tablets. "Amazon and Barnes & Noble are shaking up the media tablet market, and their success helps prove that there is an appetite for media tablets beyond Apple's iPad," Tom Mainelli, an IDC analyst, said today in a research note.

The tablet sells for $199, $300 less than Apple's least expensive iPad .

Customers prefer the less-expensive Kindle e-reader ($79) for long-form reading, the company said, adding: "In fact we've seen many customers buy two Kindles--both a Kindle Fire and a Kindle or Kindle Touch."

Updated at 2:30 p.m. PST: with analyst comments.

About the author

Brooke Crothers writes about mobile computer systems, including laptops, tablets, smartphones: how they define the computing experience and the hardware that makes them tick. He has served as an editor at large at CNET News and a contributing reporter to The New York Times' Bits and Technology sections. His interest in things small began when living in Tokyo in a very small apartment for a very long time.

 

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