Al Gore still searching for a purpose to Web 2.0 (and his career)

Al Gore really wants people to pay attention to him, even when he has nary a clue as to what he's talking about.

At the recent Web 2.0 conference in San Francisco, Al Gore went from urging entrepreneurs to make the Web like "the water that the fish don't know they're swimming in," to wondering what the heck Web 2.0 is for, anyway, as reported by ReadWriteWeb. My thoughts exactly, except completely different.

Where does inane gobblygook like this come from?

Much like puppies, according to Mr. Gore, Web 2.0 has to have a purpose. The purpose he urges us to consider is to bring about a higher level of consciousness about our relationship with this planet.

"We have everything we need to save it, and in the process create millions of new jobs, reduce our national security exposure, and solve the climate crisis," he said, but, "just as Barack Obama's election would have been impossible without the new dialogue and new ways of interacting on the Web, the only way this is going to be solved is by addressing the democracy crisis."

I need a translator to parse the Al Gore Rhetoric Machine. But I can't really blame Gore for sounding ignorant on a topic about which he is...ignorant. Still, why have him speak other than he's a Big Name to put on the agenda?

I'd rather listen to Tim O'Reilly speak for five minutes about what Web 2.0 really means and how to put it to work than Al Gore pontificate about his own blather for any length of time. He made a nice documentary. Good for him. But when he tries to tie together Web 2.0 with his politics it falls flat.

Tags:
Tech Culture
About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

    Join the discussion

    Conversation powered by Livefyre

    Don't Miss
    Hot Products
    Trending on CNET

    HOT ON CNET

    Up for a challenge?

    Put yourself to the real tech test by building your own virtual-reality headset with a few household items.