Adobe: Make room for Photoshop Lightroom

Company's photo-managing software, out of beta and available for preorder, is scheduled to ship sometime in February.

Photoshop Lightroom, the photo file manager from Adobe Systems, is now available for preorder, the company announced Monday.

Adobe's photo management software , which has been in beta for months for Windows users and since 2005 for Mac OS users, is scheduled to begin shipping in mid-February.

is a file management tool intended to complement photo-editing software such as Adobe's Photoshop. It enables photographers to import, minimally edit, manage and output batches of large digital photo files rather than having to deal with each file individually.

It is a direct competitor to Apple's Aperture 1.5 software , which currently sells for $299.

Lightroom will sell at the Adobe store for US$199 in the United States and Canada through April 30, according to Adobe. After that, it will be sold for about $299. The public beta version is set to expire February 28.

About 500,000 photographers participated in the public beta evaluation, and the company made changes based on their feedback, Adobe said in a statement.

Compared with the beta 4.1 version, Lightroom 1.0 has new keyword and metadata browsing tools for searching or filtering massive collections of digital-image files. The Key Metadata Browser incorporates color labels and a pick-or-reject system, while the import dialog box in the library module yields more file location choices when importing files, according to Adobe.

Lightroom supports more than 150 raw file formats, including those for the new Nikon D40 and D80 and Pentax K10D, as well as JPEG and TIFF files, according to Adobe.

The software runs natively on Windows PCs and on Mac computers using either Intel or Power processors. System requirements for Adobe Lightroom specify processing power, storage space, operating system and screen resolution.

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In a software-driven world, it's easy to forget about the nuts and bolts. Whether it's cars, robots, personal gadgetry or industrial machines, Candace Lombardi examines the moving parts that keep our world rotating. A journalist who divides her time between the United States and the United Kingdom, Lombardi has written about technology for the sites of The New York Times, CNET, USA Today, MSN, ZDNet, Silicon.com, and GameSpot. She is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not a current employee of CNET.

 

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