A picture says...well, you know

Key art images travel far and wide and get people excited about our upcoming shows.

We send 300 billion e-mails, 200 million tweets, and 2.5 billion text messages through our digital networks every day, according to a report originally published in The Economist. In this crazy information age where there's no lack of data vying for people's attention, a picture really does say 1,000 words or 1,000 tweets!

And when it's good, it penetrates people's brains so they remember it. That's the key in the entertainment marketing business.

At CBS, we just unveiled our "key art" for the new season shows. "Key art" is the term for the main imagery used to sell a particular show. A print ad. A digital snipe. A poster. A billboard. They all flow from the key art. Think movie poster in the lobby. This is our version.

It's designed and produced by a collaboration of very talented people -- designers, art directors, copy writers, editors, and then programmers and marketers here at CBS.

Traditionally, key art was just about advertising new shows. But today it has an added dimension: stoking fandom. Our images travel far and wide online -- circulated and consumed by the people who are most passionate about television and our shows. We love that.

For your viewing pleasure, here is a peek at the new key art for the four new series coming to CBS this fall: "Elementary," "Vegas," "Made In Jersey," and "Partners." Feel free to retweet, repost, and share, and as always, stay tuned!

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