A look at the Demo '07 standouts

With the majority of the Treo-toting crowd decamped from the desert Wednesday night, it's time to call Demo '07 officially over. With that in mind, let's recap--in no particular order--our favorites from the two-day emerging-tech conference.

Garnering the most buzz among attendees was Zink, an inkless printing technology. Or as Webware.com's Rafe Needleman called it, "Polaroid 2.0." Because Zink doesn't require any printer heads, just heat and special paper made of polymer, it leaves a really small footprint. The first applications will be a small, standalone printer and a--gasp!--self-printing camera.

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Video: Top innovations at Demo '07
An inkless printer, video e-mail and indie movies in the home: here's what CNET's Rafe Needleman and Erica Ogg found most promising at the conference.

Apollo is Adobe's new platform that lets users install Web-based applications on the desktop. During its allotted six-minute spiel, Adobe demonstrated an eBay application that works offline as well as online.

Eyejot showed off its Web-based video e-mail service, a very simple-to-use site that instantly records short video clips and sends them to anyone you want. A link to the video, hosted on Eyejot's site, is sent to your recipient. Should they be so inclined, your recipient can easily send a video reply right back.

Vuvox gets away with its clunky name because of its incredibly appealing visuals. It's a Web service for organizing multimedia presentations made for embedding onto sites such as MySpace.com. Users gather photos and videos to display on a variety of backgrounds.

Aided in part by incredibly passionate presenters, wowed the crowd with its take on "social cinema." Jaman is a site for filmmakers--the real kind, not the YouTube kind--to bypass the Hollywood studio apparatus and take films directly to the people. Content is played in high-definition and drawn from independent filmmakers worldwide, with specific focuses on Asian, South American and North American movies so far. The social part comes in when users collaborate to comment on and rate their favorites.

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About the author

Erica Ogg is a CNET News reporter who covers Apple, HP, Dell, and other PC makers, as well as the consumer electronics industry. She's also one of the hosts of CNET News' Daily Podcast. In her non-work life, she's a history geek, a loyal Dodgers fan, and a mac-and-cheese connoisseur.

 

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