A cheaper Adamo: Dell Vostro V13 hands on

Dell introduces a business thin-and-light that looks like a cousin of the Adamo, except much, much more affordable.

The Dell Vostro V13: a cheaper Adamo? Scott Stein/CNET

Today, Dell announced the availability of the Vostro V13, a new addition to its small-business Vostro line of laptops. The big news here is that it's the company's first ULV thin-and-light for the business sector, an area that seems to be a big focus factor in a down economy when lots of small business entrepreneurs are looking for affordable portables. We had the chance for a quick up-close hands-on look at one, and it's definitely an attractive little laptop.

It's certainly thin. Scott Stein/CNET

With an industrial design that's heavy on anodized aluminum and borrows a lot of what was eye-catching about the original Adamo, the Vostro V13 is .65 inch thick and weighs around 3.5 pounds, comes with a Webcam, 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and an ExpressCard slot standard, and starts at $449--but, mind you, that's a configuration that includes a single-core Celeron processor and Ubuntu Linux as an operating system.

For Windows 7 and a Core 2 Duo ULV, the price rises in the range of mid-to-high $600, which is still really good compared with its closest competitors, the HP Pavilion dm3 and Asus UL30A-A1.

The Vostro V13 will support up to 4GB of RAM, and can be optionally upgraded with 3G mobile broadband.

Battery life courtesy of the sealed-in six-cell is, according to Dell, slightly less than 5 hours, though we'll have to see for ourselves when we review one. We have to hand it to Dell, though--it seems to have taken a lot of what was so appealing about the Adamo and passed it down into a machine that'll still be sleek enough to show off. The keyboard felt nice and comfortable and the laptop has a sturdy-feeling frame, which isn't always the case with ultrathin budget-range laptops.

Check out the photos below. The Vostro V13 is already available for order on Dell's Web site.

About the author

Scott Stein is a senior editor covering iOS and laptop reviews, mobile computing, video games, and tech culture. He has previously written for both mainstream and technology enthusiast publications including Wired, Esquire.com, Men's Journal, and Maxim, and regularly appears on TV and radio talking tech trends.

 

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