A barbecue in a bucket for dad

Fire buckets provide an on-the-go option for a mini barbecue on the beach or at camp.

If dad's the sort who likes to throw an impromptu barbecue on the beach, but can't responsibly lug his 42-inch Twin Eagles premium grill with searing station to the shore, here's a suitable hibachi replacement: the bucket barbecue.

This "portable barbecue in an old-fashioned fire bucket" is designed by the folks at London-based Suck UK.

A fire bucket's second life as grill. Suck UK

It's an homage to the time when firefighters used such buckets to toss water on fires "with their bare hands." The alternate use as a bare-bones grill is a great idea, and a perfect Father's Day gift that he can toss in the trunk or hatch and take camping, to picnics, or to parties away from home.

The bucket is made of enameled metal. At $49.50, it won't break the wallet.

If this fire engine red bucket seems a bit childish for pops, Sagaform offers a classier take on the bucket grill. The 10.6 inch grill has space for six hot dogs or hamburgers. (We're talking bite-size.)

A more-refined take on the barbecue bucket. Sagaform

Like the Suck UK model, you simply dump standard charcoal briquettes inside and light up.

This model has a ball handle and folding wire feet and retails at about $34.95. Amazon.com sells a metal version of the bucket for about $25, and if you want green, try the Broadway Panhandler Web site.

As an aside, if you've got smokers in your life, Suck UK also sells a smaller version of the barbecue bucket that you fill with sand to convert to an instant ashtray at social events. The sand completely extinguishes the butts, helping to prevent that nasty Marlboro after-smell. And this bucket does double duty. If you accidentally light a buddy's hair on fire with your barbecue bucket, there's always a nearby bucket of sand to extinguish the blaze.

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About the author

    Kim Girard has written about business and technology for more than a decade, as an editor at CNET News.com, senior writer at Business 2.0 magazine and online writer at Red Herring. As a freelancer, she's written for publications including Fast Company, CIO and Berkeley's Haas School of Business. She also assisted Business Week's Peter Burrows with his 2003 book Backfire, which covered the travails of controversial Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina. An avid cook, she's blogged about the joy of cheap wine and thinks about food most days in ways some find obsessive.

     

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