3D video without the goofy glasses

The trick lies in an optical filter-coated panel and specially encoded 3D videos, derived from eight independent points of view.

Crave Asia

The next big thing after extremely high-resolution displays is, of course, 3D technology. And we're not talking about those dated 3D glasses of yesteryear, as proven by French company Alioscopy here at CommunicAsia in Singapore. Onsite and attracting quite a crowd is its $10,526 40-inch 3D monitor capable of reproducing the same enticing visual depth without cumbersome glasses.

The trick lies in an optical filter-coated panel and specially encoded 3D videos, derived from eight independent points of view, with up to a staggering bandwidth of 9GB per minute. The 3D footage can be premixed before playback or processed on the fly using a dedicated encoder. For added versatility, the display is also compatible with plain vanilla 2D programs.

Its spokesperson indicated that larger 46- and 56-inch displays are next in the pipeline. So if you're into digital signage, marketing, communications, and 3D application spaces, this may be exactly what the doctor ordered. But for now, home consumers will have to rely on products like the latest Samsung plasma TVs based on the goofy 3D glasses. (Get more CommunicAsia 2008 coverage here.)

(Source: Crave Asia)

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