123-Reg gives its customers 60 hours without email or a website

I'm still without email or a web presence, thanks to 123-Reg

Over the weekend domain hoster 123-Reg went down ( taking my own company's website and email with it ), taking customer service to all-new lows. No phone support. No email support. No web support. No notice of when the problem would be fixed, what the suspected problem was, how to deal with it, etc. Nothing.

Today, however, I woke up to this comforting (though bewildering) news from 123-Reg:

123-reg experienced intermittent performance issues on its DNS servers between late afternoon on Friday 16 November and Sunday 18 November. This meant that some customers have encountered difficulties with their domain names during this period. This problem was caused by a combination of excessive loading on the DNS servers and a rare hardware failure. During this time, 123-reg engineers have replaced the hardware and full service has been resumed.

Actually, full service has not resumed. I'm still without email and a website. Maybe I have to wait another 48 hours or so for the DNS servers to resolve. Amazing.

But what I find more baffling is that they blame it on hardware failure. Hardware failure???? I know individual servers fail, but to have an entire data center go down? I'm not a hardware guy, but to me this sounds like poorly planned clustering.

This is shockingly bad customer service. The 45 seconds of nirvana I had at being without email is long gone. I want my service back. Unfortunately, I and other 123-Reg customers may have to find it with a company other than 123-Reg.

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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