How to set up speed dial on your Android phone

Smartphones have made reaching people much simpler--just a few clicks and you're connected. For numbers we call frequently, though, those few clicks can start to feel unreasonably burdensome. Learn how to condense them into just one or two clicks per contact in this blog post by Rob Lightner.

In the old days, speed dial was a vital phone function that saved time and energy, but now that so many of us have outsourced our contact info storage to smartphones, the feature doesn't get nearly enough love. Sure, you can reach almost any contact with just three or four clicks, but for those we reach out to every day, that is two or three clicks too many. Your Android phone has a built-in speed dial function that's under the radar, but if you're willing to give up space on a home screen, you can set up a snazzy one-click speed dial page in just a few minutes.

  1. Pick which screen you want to use. Thanks to a couple of accidental dials, I now use the screen immediately to the left of my home screen, but if your fingers are less clumsy than mine, you may want to add a few high-frequency contacts to your home screen. You don't have to keep all your one-click contacts on one screen, but since this is all about saving time and mental energy, it may be best to do just that.
  2. Press and hold on the screen you've selected, then click "Shortcuts," then "Direct dial" or "Direct message."
    Android Select shortcut
    Step 2 - Select "Direct dial" or "Direct message"
  3. Page through your contacts and select whichever BFF is getting the one-click treatment. Contacts with multiple lines might need multiple shortcuts, depending on which numbers you're likeliest to call or message.
  4. Organize your icons in a way that makes sense to you. It may take a day or two for you to quickly remember where everyone is on the screen, but once it's intuitive, you'll be a one-click wonder!
    Android speed dial screen
    Android speed dial screen
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About the author

    Rob Lightner is a tech and gaming writer based in Seattle. He has reviewed games, gadgets, and technical manuals, written copy for space travel gear, and composed horoscopes for cats.

     

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