How to send links from Android device to computer browser

If you're browsing on your Android device and want to save a page for use on another computer, it can take several steps--unless you use the free Android2Cloud app and the Chrome browser.

Whether you're in transit, waiting in line at the DMV, or between appointments, mobile browsing can be a sanity saver. It's not all disposable entertainment, of course, as sometimes you stumble onto a page you want to investigate later on your laptop or desktop machine. It's not that hard to e-mail yourself a link and open it later, but there's a better way. Android2Cloud lets you send links directly to the Chrome browser running on a particular machine, saving you time and making you more likely to actually follow up. Here's how to get started:

Install the Android2Cloud app on your Android device and the A2C extension on the Chrome browser on the machine you want use to view saved pages. The Chrome installation sends you to a setup page that is a breeze to click through and it ends with a QR code for the app, so you may want to start with the Chrome installation. (You can set up multiple machines, but each time you share, it only goes to one of them.)

Once the app and extension are set up, it's painless to send pages to Chrome. When you've found something you have to see on a larger screen or look into more deeply, just select the Menu button, then "More," then "Share page," then the alphabetically convenient "android2cloud."

Android web page share options
Select "android2cloud"

A new page pops up; most users can just click "Send" and wait a bit for the link to find its way to the right machine. If you've got more than one computer running Chrome, you can set up each one with a different name and choose which gets the link each time you share.

Android2Cloud's send screen
Android2Cloud's send screen

It has taken anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes for pages to pop up in my browser as a new, focused tab in my most recently highlighted Chrome window. If you're on the go, your shared tabs will either be open when you return or will come up when you start Chrome next.

About the author

    Rob Lightner is a tech and gaming writer based in Seattle. He has reviewed games, gadgets, and technical manuals, written copy for space travel gear, and composed horoscopes for cats.

     

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