How to resize images in iPhoto '11

Learn how to resize images in iPhoto.

Adjusting the JPEG's quality or sze will adjust the file size or image size, respectively. Matt Elliott/CNET

With Facebook and Twitter and photo-sharing sites like Flickr and Picasa, it's not as common to e-mail photos as it was a few years ago. One of the many ways these online services are convenient for sharing photos is they automatically resize them. Show of hands: how many times have you been e-mailed a photo that was so gigantic that you needed to scroll up and down, left and right to make sense of it? And with the megapixel count of today's cameras, we all have the capacity to e-mail enormously oversize images. If there is a book of e-mail decorum, resizing a photo before e-mailing it should be one of the first chapters. And if you are uploading a photo rather than e-mailing it, reducing the size of your images can greatly speed up the upload time.

For Mac users, iPhoto makes it easy to resize a photo. Here's how:

To resize a photo in iPhoto '11, select the photo or photos you want to adjust and click on the File button from from menu bar. Then choose Export or hit Command-Shift-E. In the Export window, choose File Export, which lets you adjust the size of the image. Your options are small, medium, large, and full-size. You can also select a custom size. If actual photo size is less important than the size of the file, you can also adjust the JPEG quality, choosing from low, medium, high, and max.

After adjusting the properties of your photo or your batch of photos, you can export it to a location of your choosing on your Mac. From here, you can attach it to an e-mail.

Alternatively, you can e-mail a photo or photos directly from iPhoto '11. Click the Share button in the lower-right corner and select Email. Here, you'll be able to select the size--small, medium, large, actual size--of your e-mail attachment, along with a template from the choices in the right-hand column. When you choose a size for the image or images, the total file size is reported below the preview of your message, which is handy if you know the limit of your friend's corporate e-mail account, for example. And if you choose the Classic template (and by "Classic" Apple means the absence of a template), you'll see the size of the images in the preview pane change as you change the photo size.

 

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